Reviews

Widows

Elijah Davidson
Widows
Widows is a treat. Intelligent thrillers made for adults feel too rare these days. Widows is intelligent in its construction too. McQueen didn’t leave his visual verve in the airport bookstall.

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindlewald

Elijah Davidson
Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindlewald
Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald, falters. The first half of the movie is a motivation-less mess that cannot be overcome by the more focused and engaging second half. Hopefully the series will regain its footing in the next installment, due in 2020.

Can You Ever Forgive Me?

Elijah Davidson
Can You Ever Forgive Me?
Can You Ever Forgive Me? is a funny, intelligent film. It's also a bit cold, but it's a chilly blast of honesty, not a lack of feeling, that animates the film. It's a helpful reminder that the world has little room for odd-duck writers who don't glom onto the publicity machine.

The Nutcracker and the Four Realms

Roslyn Hernandez
The Nutcracker and the Four Realms
The way in which The Nutcracker and the Four Realms fails to do justice to the ballet classic, break-out and prove itself as a film, and be culturally corrective is truly extraordinary. Do yourself a favor and watch the ballet instead.

First Man

Elijah Davidson
First Man
Riding rockets is a chaotic, cacophonous affair in First Man, full of worrying creaks and gut-checking metallic groans. Janet Armstrong accuses the NASA leadership of being “boys playing with balsa wood” at one point in the film, and you feel like she has a point.

The Old Man and the Gun

Elijah Davidson
The Old Man and the Gun
Lowery’s style is a far cry from Michael Mann or Jean Pierre Melville. His storytelling is more understated, like that of early Malick, George Roy Hill, Hal Ashby, Robert Altman, or that of this movie’s star, Robert Redford. Sly not slick. Americana not cinematheque.

The Sisters Brothers

Elijah Davidson
The Sisters Brothers
At its core, writer/director Jacques Audiard’s American West is a lonely place where no one fits, and the only option men and women have for carving out a niche for themselves is to do so chopping into society, gouging out a groove, and holding onto it via the careful employment of further violence.

A Simple Favor

Elijah Davidson
A Simple Favor
A Simple Favor is somewhat uneven. The comedic elements sometimes—but not always!—feel too broad, and the suspense is a little—but not entirely!—strained. All the pieces, even the annoying ones, do matter in the end, and for that I was grateful.

BlacKkKlansman

Elijah Davidson
BlacKkKlansman
BlacKkKlansman is an awakening, a reminder that we can be more like Ron Stallworth, that he is not exceptional, until, perhaps, the very, very end, depending on how you read it, when Lee elevates Stallworth to

Eighth Grade

gingle87
Eighth Grade
As someone on the margins of her own middle school society, Kayla possesses a keen awareness of who around her is being fake and who is being genuine. Even so, she herself is not immune to the desire for acceptance and struggles through several instances of identity crisis.
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