FILM

The Workers Cup
By Monica Finnigan on February 12, 2017

The Workers Cup is oddly a light-hearted yet serious film that deals with the complexities of poverty, wealth, human necessity, image, big business, and the exploitation of employees by their contractors. Along with stunning shots of Qatar, the film does superb job of highlighting several perspectives of workers on their job in the camp — some hating it, and some needing it, while at the same time, exposing the social justice issues at hand.

While the film followed the soccer team of a company building the FIFA World Cup stadium, the team and company chosen for the film includes workers in the best living conditions of the labor camps, thus the deepest disparity of worker's camps is not seen in the film. The beauty of this film is found in its juxtaposition of sport. It is sport (and the business of sport) that is portrayed as broken, as it is the source of injustice and human exploitation. This is contrasted with sport in its purest form (the love of the game) which serves as the workers truest joy and greatest escape from the conditions that they live in. It is sport that put them in the camp, and it is sport that also helps them escape. The brokenness of the gift of sport and the beauty of the gift of sport all in one film.

About the Author: Monica Finnigan
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